Colt Officer's Model Match - 38 Special

Ben

Moderator
Staff member
He loves shooting.
He can't go and can't stay long enough............

Ben
 

CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
Nicely done, young man!

I had a Colt OMM in 22 LR for a time, it got sold in The Great Divorce Fire Sale of 1983. I really miss that wheelgun, it was a jewel. Since that time, I found a Colt Officer's Model Target in 38 Special of (I think....) 1949 vintage. It shoots wonderfully. In times past when Buckshot started going wide about his K-38 at Burrito Shoots, the Colt OMT was the tool used to trim his navigation-on-plane a bit. I have owned a bunch of 38 Specials, but this one is likely the most accurate revolver in 38 Special that I have ever owned. That it celebrates its 70th birthday this year only adds to its luster.
 
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Ben

Moderator
Staff member
The old Colts are a joy to own and shoot.
Getting a bit pricey,..... but if you can afford one, I say get it.

Ben
 

Rootmanslim

Banned
I have all 3 (22,32,38) and a New Service Match in 45 Colt. (predecessor to the Shooting Master) Only wish I could shoot as well as they can.

The 32 cost almost as much as the other 3 combined. One of only 49 made due a fouled up order from MA Quartermaster.







 
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Pistolero

Well-Known Member
I foolishly pushed just a bit too hard on getting a better price for one of these about 10-12 years ago
at a gun show. I regretted it the next day, and ever since. Dumb move. In retrospect, the price was
quite reasonable, I was unreasonable. Oh, well, live and learn. :embarrassed:

Fine gun, good job running it, too.

Bill
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Yeah, well this was a few years ago, IIRC, he was at $350 or 375 and I wanted it for $325. :rolleyes:

Somtimes, do you ever wonder "What was I thinking!?" after you did something?
The gun was in very good condition.
 

Bisley

Member
I was sixteen and asked my Dad what was a good target revolver to get. I knew he regretted not trading a Walther PPK for a pre-WW2 OMT. I saw one in Shotgun News for $375 plus shipping, in box with paperwork. Dad made the purchase, and I paid about six weeks' bus boy tips back to Dad in $1 and $5 bills.

Shot the Star load of H&G #50 over 2.7 grains of Bullseye sized .358 out of the Star tool. Then Dad told me he had a match load of 5.4 Unique under Lyman 358416. Stopped that after a couple hundred rounds, but it did shoot to the same point of aim at 50 yards as the Bullseye load at 25. I won't abuse it anymore. It does not lead, and the Bullseye and wadcutter loads give me 2 1/2 inches at 25 yards, the last time I shot it 20 years ago. But I think that is the result of size-on-seating with the carbide dies. I will have to wring it out -- with standard target loads -- further when it warms up a bit.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
I found that old RCBS .38 Spl "Wadcutter dies", marked that way on the cardboard box,
will do about 1/4" neck sizing at the top of the case, and then expand it properly. These produce
somewhat better loads in one of my Model 14s, although a Hornady die set, when I use a long
larger diam expander that I made will do just about as good, but it works the brass a good bit more,
probably will not last as long.

I wish I had paid the extra bit, darn it.

Bill
 

Ben

Moderator
Staff member
I have all 3 (22,32,38) and a New Service Match in 45 Colt. (predecessor to the Shooting Master) Only wish I could shoot as well as they can.

The 32 cost almost as much as the other 3 combined. One of only 49 made due a fouled up order from MA Quartermaster.







Those are some fine old Colts !!!!!

Ben
 

Bisley

Member
I found that old RCBS .38 Spl "Wadcutter dies", marked that way on the cardboard box,
will do about 1/4" neck sizing at the top of the case, and then expand it properly. These produce
somewhat better loads in one of my Model 14s, although a Hornady die set, when I use a long
larger diam expander that I made will do just about as good, but it works the brass a good bit more,
probably will not last as long.

I wish I had paid the extra bit, darn it.

Bill
Pistolero,

What about using .38 Super dies to size? I have also read that .38 Super Lee Factory Crimp Dies are just wide enough to size the Special casings, but leave them wide enough to accept Cast Lead to larger size without squeezing them down. I do remember that the Star tool does not leave me with hourglass cases on the finished rounds. I did not have problems with accuracy or lead cutting at the cylinder until I used the carbide dies, either.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
What a collection of old Colt target revolvers. Beautiful

As to .38 Super, I used that for .38 S&W until I got the right dies, never tried it for .38 Spl
at all.

Bill
 

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
Rootmanslim, nice collection!!! I have a Colt Officers Model like those, at least that what I think it is, I'm no Colt expert. I think it's a 7.5" barrel with a Paine bead front sight. Definitely a field gun as the bead is awful on a bullseye. My eyes can't possibly do that gun justice anymore.
 

Dpmsman

Member
Yeah, well this was a few years ago, IIRC, he was at $350 or 375 and I wanted it for $325. :rolleyes:

Somtimes, do you ever wonder "What was I thinking!?" after you did something?
The gun was in very good condition.
I know the feeling! I bought a Colt shooting master 38 two years ago from a local dealer for $700 thinking it was a gunsmith rework. Knowing it was a shooting master and pretty rare I bought it as a project gun. A few months later I was showing it to a friend at a gun show and another vendor offered to buy it. Even though I didn’t want to sell it I did anyway for a small profit. After more research I figured out it was a King sight Colt Shooting Master. :headbang: Not sure what the real value is but it must be pretty rare!