Double rifle ........

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
Saw it off to about 20" and sleeve both tubes to .460 S&W Magnum. It would also chamber and fire .45 Raptor. It would still handle like a Hi-Lift jack but recoil would be negligible.
I just spit coffee all over the screen!:rofl:
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
I have a 10 ga Lyman roll crimp tool 12 ga decapping pins .
It just kills me to spend as much for plastic shotshells as I spent for 1x 32 Rem and 264 WM cases .

$11 each for A turned brass case .........a guy could get some 20mm cases and a swage die and make money turning the swage hump off the head .......
Ok , that was just a frustrated blurt , but you can see the point .

Ian that was exactly the idea .

A 10 ga stage gun . That would certainly make it faster to point .
Maybe just a barrel insert to start , proof of concept .

Is it an integral suppressor device if a sub bore barrel retention nut has a plus one caliber exit and vents gas into the void between the chamber adapter/sub caliber barrel and the full ID of the OM barrel ?
No you're right I don't want to be the test case either .

Maybe it's best just to file this under the good idea fairy .
 

scb

New Member
I have had some experience with this type of project having built 2 of them. The first was a 45/70 built on a 20 gauge SKB 280. Someone had put a wad of snow in one of the muzzles and fired it with predictable results. SKB barrels are built using the mono-block system so the barrels are easily removed and replaced. Regulating them took some time but I was eventually able to get them to shoot to within an inch and a half of each other at 50 yards. This is the one gun I really really regret selling.

The other one I still have is built on a Winchester 20 gauge Model 101. For this one I was able to find a set of wrecked Winchester 20 ga. M96 barrels. The M96 was a less expensive version of the M101 but a lot of the part were/are interchangeable. These barrels were also built on mono-blocks. This one, for some reason, was easier to regulate. Perhaps it’s because the barrels are stacked or maybe I just got lucky. Another thing that made this conversion easier was that I was able to simply get a set of .410 extractors and recut the with the 45/70 chamber reamer.

Anyway while I did not have to do this with either of these two projects because they relativity modern firearms for your own safety, yes I know there are a lot of safety concerns on a project like this but I haven’t seen this one mentioned, one must bush the firing pins to a smaller diameter if you are converting to a cartridge with a chamber pressure higher than that of the original. If this is not done a face full of hot gas and perhaps even splinters is a definite possibility. Good luck with your project. If you are looking for suggestions, I think I would go with 2 fully rifled 12 ga. barrels.
 
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Ian

Notorious member
Good point on turning down and bushing the firing pins.

I'd ask Tim's opinion on regulation and liner length. My approach would be to O-ring full length liners in on both ends and make muzzle bushings that thread on the liner and could be re-made eccentric if necessary and castellated on the end so they could be tuned with a spanner or choke wrench without rotating the liner itself. If you really wanted to be crafty, thread the muzzle of the liner back about an inch, make a 3/8" long nut that O-rings to the barrel for center and regulation (eccentric if necessary, or have a selection of them made), then have 1/2" long flanged muzzle nuts made to pull the liners in tension inside the barrels. I don't think there's any chance a short liner is going to make it more quiet, and none of the chamber insert makers have been indicted for making "suppressor parts" in the case of a 6" .22 LR or 9mm insert stuffed in, say, a 34" 12-gauge tube, so I wouldn't worry about that. Only legal issue is 18" is minimum barrel length even if you have it totally stubbed out or barrels completely replaced with metallic cartridge barrels...once a shotgun, always a shotgun unless you paper and engrave it as a short shotgun or AOW.

For extraction, I'd just put a fingernail relief in the face of the liner and either remove the 10-gauge extractors or clearance the rim of the liner for them so they don't interfere with each other.
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
I would expect the 10 ga even a BP basis to be about equal to a 45-70 the 35 kpsi 460 not so much . Yes it was designed around much more but that's where the current load data parks it .
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
Good point on turning down and bushing the firing pins.

I'd ask Tim's opinion on regulation and liner length. My approach would be to O-ring full length liners in on both ends and make muzzle bushings that thread on the liner and could be re-made eccentric if necessary and castellated on the end so they could be tuned with a spanner or choke wrench without rotating the liner itself. If you really wanted to be crafty, thread the muzzle of the liner back about an inch, make a 3/8" long nut that O-rings to the barrel for center and regulation (eccentric if necessary, or have a selection of them made), then have 1/2" long flanged muzzle nuts made to pull the liners in tension inside the barrels. I don't think there's any chance a short liner is going to make it more quiet, and none of the chamber insert makers have been indicted for making "suppressor parts" in the case of a 6" .22 LR or 9mm insert stuffed in, say, a 34" 12-gauge tube, so I wouldn't worry about that. Only legal issue is 18" is minimum barrel length even if you have it totally stubbed out or barrels completely replaced with metallic cartridge barrels...once a shotgun, always a shotgun unless you paper and engrave it as a short shotgun or AOW.

For extraction, I'd just put a fingernail relief in the face of the liner and either remove the 10-gauge extractors or clearance the rim of the liner for them so they don't interfere with each other.
Pretty much what I've envisioned doing when I had a wild hair up there and was dreaming. I like the idea of keeping the liner in tension.