Preferred cast bullet for .38/.357 loads

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
I always thought the 32's were more of a field gun, for the woods walker or field stroller. Anything up to large coyote sized stuff at least was fair game. I suppose a light weight 38 shooting bullets int he same class (115-125gr) would be about the same. Never really considered it before. Interesting.
 

Rally

NC Minnesota
Seems your correct Bret. I know a few trappers that do just that. I’ve got a marlin 1894 Cl in .32-20 that is just fun to carry. Loading a 115 gr dp in it at 1350.
 

RicinYakima

High Steppes of Eastern Washington
I always thought the 32's were more of a field gun, for the woods walker or field stroller. Anything up to large coyote sized stuff at least was fair game. I suppose a light weight 38 shooting bullets int he same class (115-125gr) would be about the same. Never really considered it before. Interesting.
My 32 WCF S&W MP Target is a hardened cylinder revolver and will shoot hot enough loads for coyotes, at least to 50 yards. But my 32 ACP and NP's and Long's are at maximum 25 yards, only because none of them are accurate enough for a rabbit's head any further than that. Within their range, they are small eatable game guns. My Browning Model 53 with rifle loads will shoot through 14 inches of coyote, and would not be afraid to shoot whitetails at 100 yards.
 

Rick H

Member
I am a fan of the Lee 358-125-RF as well. My only 38 Special is the Ruger LCRx3 and they duplicate the WW 130 HP's that I carry with. My alloy drops them at 128gr. and they are easy to duplicate the commercial load with. Accurate as well.
 

Alstep

New Member
I've got a SAECO 052 WC that shoots a cut above everything else I have. Lyman 358311 and RCBS 38-150 KT are a close second. Seat 'em long in .38 Spec brass to shoot in .357 guns. Size .359--- 1 Pb/1WW--- NRA lube.
 
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Pistolero

Well-Known Member
I recently got the Lee 358 125 RF and cast up a few hundred. Only did a couple of test loads, mostly
looking to see if a newer (80s vintage) S&W HB Model 10 would shoot to the fixed sights with a 125.
It did, so that question was answered. Now I need to make up a range of loads and see how well they
shoot in general, not just POA, generally (height, actually).

Bill
 

MW65

Wetside, Oregon
I was wondering about the Lee 125. Might be fun with the victory model. Has anyone on the board tried the Lee 125 in 35 REM?
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
I sourced the Lee 125rf to make my WWII Victory model shoot to the sights at 15-25 yards. Anything heavier printed 3-4" high.
 

waco

Springfield, Oregon
I sourced the Lee 125rf to make my WWII Victory model shoot to the sights at 15-25 yards. Anything heavier printed 3-4" high.
I was half looking at one of these inexpensive Rock Island revolvers. Might be a good bullet to try with this one, Price is right.
 

KeithB

Resident Half Fast Machinist
Is that a Colt type pull back cylinder release? For the price, if it was decent at all, it could be a good tackle box gun.
 

Cherokee

Well-Known Member
don't overlook the NOE 357135 RF. It has the same nose profile as the Lee 358158 and cast out at 138-139 gr from WW+2% tin and easily sizes to .358. The Lee 358125 RF also woks good for me. BTW, the NOE 357135 shoots great in 38 Super.
 

KeithB

Resident Half Fast Machinist
Any idea on the internal construction? i.e. coil vs flat springs, etc. Older Colts seem to be a little more fragile than the comparable S&Ws of the time. Just wondering. Read the reviews, one said the internals were not Colt-like but no elaboration.

At that price you could buy three of those for every GP100 or M10. Not to restart any arguments about 9mm vs .38, auto vs revolver, but for a lot of people that is probably one of the best and most cost effective solutions for home defense.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Looking at parts diagrams, it seems fairly similar internally to the Colt King Cobra design, which
was a total break with Colt's earlier revolvers, which were internally pretty much the same for the
double action models (New Service and Police Positive are the ones I am most familiar with).
Numrich parts diagram shows all coil springs. The real fragility of the older Colts is
really their design of the hand which holds the cylinder hard locked against the cylinder bolt
during hammer drop and firing. If there is the slightest misalignment of chamber and bbl (almost
guaranteed on at least one hole) the bullet forces the cylinder to line up, putting a hammer blow
on the top of the hand, shortening it over time, leading to 'short timing' issues. OTOH, S&Ws have a bit
of intentional rotational slop to let this self-alignment of a few thousandths (if needed) take place
without any loads on the internal parts. My PP had a short hand when I first got it, so I learned to
smith on Colts.
Not sure if the King Cobra design does that same "locked cylinder at firing" deal.

Amazing price for a steel revolver. If it is as good as the reports, it is a real bargain, although no beauty.

Not much real competition anywhere near that price point, including used. I am entirely unimpressed with
Tauri, seen WAY too many early failures. No such reports with this one, so far at least. LGS stopped
carrying Taurus a number of years ago. They have a range on site, and way too many brand new Taurus
guns were broken in the first firing session, and required the shooter to send to Brazil with 3 month turn
around to fix. The LGS got sick of angering customers. And I rebuilt a Taurus 1911 for a friend, good frame,
bbl, slide but the small internal parts - not good, hammer started following 200 rds from new. Owned by
a good friend.

Bill
 
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